I don’t believe in God, I believe in Stories – or, maybe it’s Vonnegut

“There are plenty of good reasons for fighting, but no good reason ever to hate without reservation, to imagine that God Almighty Himself hates with you, too.”
Though this quote comes from the World War II-centered Mother Night (published in 1961), its wisdom and ugly truth still ring. Vonnegut (who often said “The only difference between Bush and Hitler is that Hitler was elected”) was righteously skeptical about war, having famously survived the only one worth fighting in his lifetime. And it’s never been more true: Left or right, Christian or Muslim, those convinced they’re doing violence in service of a higher power and against an irretrievably inhuman enemy are the most dangerous creatures of all.

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Sherman Alexie on book banning

. . . the one thing i always sniffed out instantly was condescension, and as soon as an adult condescended to me I shut them out completely. And actually, I think most literature designed for young people is condescending and when they run into a book that is not, a book that is realistic, that deals with their emotions and their lives in a respectful, honest, often bloody and painful way uh… you know they’re invigorated, they’re excited. I mean they go crazy!

. . . I fully support [the right of parents] to decide what their children read, but they don’t get to decide what other children read, they don’t get to decide what a community reads . . .

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Runaway Story Rescued by Ancient Poetic Technique

The Western version of the pantoum is a poem of indefinite length made up of stanzas whose four lines are repeated in a pattern: lines 2 and lines 4 of each stanza are repeated as lines 1 and 3 of the next stanza, and so on, as shown below:

Line 1
Line 2
Line 3
Line 4

Line 5 – same as line 2
Line 6
Line 7 – same as line 4
Line 8

Line 9 – same as line 6
Line 10
Line 11 – same as line 8
Line 12

And so on.

Sometimes the final stanza has a neat twist: although it fist and third lines are as usual the same as the second and fourth lines in the stanza above it, its second and fourth lines are the same as the third and first lines of the very first stanza. This way, every line in the poem is used twice, and the first line of the poem is the same as the last. Rhyme is optional . . .

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Infinite Love, Ray Bradbury!

Words of wisdom:

“The man who cannot laugh freely is a sick man . . . ”

“The only thing you’re ever going to own is your work.”

“We belong by doing, we own by doing, we love by doing . . . ”

Happy Birthday, Mr. Bradbury!

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