I’m gonna try with a little help from my friends

Asking for help can open our hearts.

Yes, it is true, it is very hard to make money from music (or writing for that matter) anymore, when it is so easy to copy. As a musician and a writer and a teacher, I have struggled with the issues of having my work “taken” without a credit, which is insulting (and paradoxically, a compliment) when it is compounded with the very little money I do happen to make. Most people who are creative have experienced this in some way or another.

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Amanda Palmer and a still from her Kickstarter Campaign video

And, too, do we not derive so much of our inspiration from others? How do we honor those who inspire us?

Don’t we make art to share it and get it out there anyway?

And what about connection? I think this is what struck me about Amanda’s talk, is that it all comes down to connection. That is what creative work is all about – ultimately connecting with others – immediately, and, across time and space.

It takes courage to know that our creative work and the connection is worth something – and that the exchange has meaning and value for all participants. The giving and receiving is the gift.

Amanda talks about shame, too. And as I absorb this talk, and her work that I have been following over the last few years, I am starting to think – “What kinds of people do I want in my life? People who shame me, or people who love me?” I’ve never quite “fit in” with the paradigm of selfishness and non-sharing and non-compassion and shut-up-and-just-be-pretty-and-you’ll-be-just-fine. As a result, I’ve experienced some profound connections and sometimes deep rejection and loneliness, too. It’s virtually impossible to trust someone who shames you.

Gratitude for Amanda Palmer. She’s been inspiring me a lot over the last year or so — her courage spills over and has pushed some darkness out of my heart.

And in the end, yes, the connection comes down to trust. Trusting, trusting, trusting. My life is completely in the air right now, and yet, today, I feel alright. Yesterday, I was talking with a friend (and it all began because I asked for help), and another friend dropped by and said, “Hey Hol, what are you doing?” and I said, “I’m talking with Stephanie.” And my friend starts to laugh, “I see that! What are you doing with your life?” and I said, “The most important thing I’m doing right now is talking with you and Stephanie. Living in the moment.” And I paused, and thought, “Yeah, this is where I want to be right now.”

And thanks, everyone, for reading. I would love to hear your thoughts.

Much love,

Holly

PS: Check out Amanda’s blog